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2013-14 Austin Toros Season Review

Cross-Posted from TorosNation.com.

As the 2013 -2014 NBA D-League season comes to a close, teams are looking back at the season along with their rosters and doing one of two things.  They are looking at what adjustments they need to make as they begin their journey in to the playoffs or they are evaluating their players’ performances with an eye towards next year.

Unfortunately for the Austin Toros, they find themselves in the cellar of the NBA D-League’s Central Division and looking towards how to prepare for next season.

While their 19-31 record left much to be desired, the Toros were among league leaders in field goal percentage at 46.7%.

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Dexter Pittman. (Photo by Ronald Oswalt)

Going into next season, the team will have to work on improving the on the offensive end.  While they were among the league leaders in field goal percentage, their offense in the paint was slowed down by their lack of three-point shooting.  The Toros averaged 8.1 shots made which put them among the bottom half of the league.   Defenses were able to clog the paint due to not having to worry bout guarding as tightly on the perimeter.

The traffic in the paint also prevented guards from being able drive to the basket.  As a result, the Toros were tied with the Erie BayHawks for the least amount of free throw attempts per game with 43.3 trips per game.

On the defensive side of the court, the Toros excelled at protecting the rim.  Opponents shot 33 percent within 10 feet.  The mid-range to the perimeter areas are where teams hurt them, shooting 38 percent from these areas of the floor.

Among the Toros players that spent a majority of the 2013-2014 season with the team, Ronald “Flip” Murray led the team with a 21.8 points per game average. Dexter Pittman was among league leaders with 2.3 blocks per game. Myck Kabongo was not far down the list with 2.0 blocks per game

In order for the Toros to reclaim the NBA D-League title, they will need to get back to basics and focus on protecting not only the paint but making sure opponents get tough looks from the perimeter and on mid-range jumpers as well.

As the 2013 -2014 NBA D-League season comes to a close, teams are looking back at the season along with their rosters and doing one of two things.  They are looking at what adjustments they need to make as they begin their journey in to the playoffs or they are evaluating their players’ performances with an eye towards next year.

Unfortunately for the Austin Toros, they find themselves in the cellar of the NBA D-League’s Central Division and looking towards how to prepare for next season.

While their 19-31 record left much to be desired, the Toros were be among league leaders in field goal percentage at 46.7%.

Going in to next season, the team will have to work on improving the on the offensive end.  While they were among the league leaders in field goal percentage, their offense in the paint was slowed down by their lack of three-point shooting.  The Toros averaged 8.1 shots made which put them among the bottom half of the league.   Defenses were able to clog the paint due to not having to worry bout guarding as tightly on the perimeter.

The traffic in the paint also prevented guards from being able drive to the basket.  As a result, the Toros were tied with the Erie BayHawks for the least amount of free throw attempts per game with 43.3 trips per game.

On the defensive side of the court, the Toros excelled at protecting the rim.  Opponents shot 33 percent within 10 feet.  The mid-range to the perimeter areas are where teams hurt them, shooting 38 percent from these areas of the floor.

Among the Toros players that spent a majority of the 2013-2014 season with the team, Ronald “Flip” Murray led the team with a 21.8 points per game average. Dexter Pittman was among league leaders with 2.3 blocks per game. Myck Kabongo was not far down the list with 2.0 blocks per game

In order for the Toros to reclaim the NBA D-League title, they will need to get back to basics and focus on protecting not only the paint but making sure opponents get tough looks from the perimeter and on mid-range jumpers as well.

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