‘Iceman’ not fond of 3-point shot

If you drive by any open rec-league or park court, you can always identify the three-point marksman in a full court pick up game. Some players revolve their entire arsenal around the three point shot from their youthful days to even a professional in the NBA.

San Antonio Spurs legend George Gervin, however, isn’t too fond of the three point shot as you’ll see in this video posted by the San Antonio Spurs’ official website.

Gervin says that the three point shot isn’t very consistent since the highest a player can usually shoot is 40 percent. He advises young players to stay away from the three point shot and earn three points another way – with the “and-one.”

Though Gervin has a point, there are also countless basketball players in the NBA both past and present who wouldn’t be on a team if they weren’t three point shooters. If you look at the Spurs, players like Bruce Bowen, Steve Kerr, and even Matt Bonner were all built into the teams offensive system because of their ability to shoot the three.

Today, NBA champion Dirk Nowitzki has one of the most spectacular skill sets because not only can he post, drive, and fade, but he can even hit the the open three when given the opportunity.

Whenever someone gives the “Is Kobe better than Jordan debate?”, the argument is usually presented that Bryant shoots more three’s than Jordan ever did.

In all respect to Iceman, he was a lengthy six-footer who was blessed with the ability to drive to the basket and finger roll or dunk over people. I can’t say that I was born with the same skills so for a regular guy like me, being able to shoot a three in a rec-league game gives me an extra skill set I wouldn’t possess had there not been a three point line.


What do you have to say Spurs fans? Agree with the Iceman?

Paul Garcia

About Paul Garcia

Paul is a San Antonio Spurs credentialed media member for Project Spurs. He covered the 2013 NBA All-Star Game in Houston, TX, and the 2013 and 2014 NBA Finals. Paul has been featured on WOAI, Fox 29, and numerous nationwide radio shows.

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